joey ramone

The Ramones: New Deluxe It’s Alive Out In September

End of the Century 40th Anniversary Expanded Edition Scheduled  

BY HARVEY KUBERNIK © 2019 

With the new September 2019 deluxe edition of the 1979 Ramones’ tour album, It’s Alive, and the planned last quarter 2019/early 2020 40th

Courtesy Rhino/WMG

anniversary of the original Phil Spector-produced End of the Century, with producer Rick Rubin now involved for an expanded reissue of the initial pressing, multi-instrumentalist David Kessel and his cavehollywood.com website asked me to re-visit End of the Century, cut at the landmark Gold Star Recording Studios in Hollywood. 

I was in attendance at just about all End of the Century sessions, as a food runner, and on occasion, supplied hand claps and percussion, and was credited on a few tracks.  

 I eventually penned the liner notes for a 2002 Rhino Records repackage of the album.  It was an assignment that came just after ownership changes at the label. The late great Gary Stewart graciously insisted that I do them knowing I covered the Ramones/Spector relationship for the London-based Melody Maker.   

So, before we hear the upcoming “revised” Rhino/WMG label End of the Century in a handful of months, cavehollywood.com is displaying portions from my 2002 product text with additional and un-published 2002 interviews with Johnny, Dee Dee and Marky Ramone.     Continue reading

Cave Hollywood’s David Kessel shares this about The Ramones

Myself and Cave Hollywood are proud to display Harvey Kubernik’s story on The Ramones, which also features his own archive interviews with Punk pioneers, Dee Dee and Johnny Ramone

Slug 7 inch vinyl picture sleeve Photo Credit: Photo Courtesy Sire Warner Bros Records

Slug 7 inch vinyl picture sleeve
Photo Credit: Photo Courtesy Sire Warner Bros Records

In 1975 in LA, as the Glitter scene was fading out, there was a sense of yet another change happening in music and it’s associated culture. There was a

lot of action that we were hearing about coming out of London, and then New York about a new scene called “Punk Rock”. I immediately could see an emergence of a real Rock ‘N’ Roll revolution. You didn’t need to be super talented, but you had to have attitude and rawness. Songs could have only 2 or three chords. No big record deals (yet), self releases, Fanzines, and word of mouth promotion.

When the first Ramones album came out, it hit me like a Punk Rock “Meet The Beatles”, coming out of left field and galvanizing a whole new generation ready for musical rebellion against over produced sappy, meaningless music being churned out by record companies. I went to their first ever gig in LA at the Roxy on the Sunset Strip in 1976. I saw the very first show and brought enough people, so we could applaud loud and long, to make sure they did an encore at their first show and first performance in LA. My good friend Rodney Bingenheimer, “The Punk and New Wave DJ” on KROQ introduced me to the band. I told them that I absolutely loved what they were doing musically and culturally. I also mentioned that my brother and I were working steadily with Phil Spector in the studio, and with Phil Spector Productions in general. Continue reading